Cooper Hewitt Design Museum

When you’re in New York, a trip to the renovated Cooper Hewitt Design Museum is a must. It’s a much more lively and engaging experience than most museums. The new interactive Pen allows you to collect the pieces you love, learn more, and create your own designs. I love seeing works from my book in real life, and saw Herbert Bayer’s 1953 Olivetti poster and Milton Glaser’s 1960s Dylan poster, among others. Read more about the museum in my article in ArtDesk magazine.

GI_CH_Bayer-Glaser

12 Days of Designers

Designing for the holidays can be a tough. How can you create a greeting each year that looks appropriate yet hasn’t been done a million times before? I dug through the archives of the designers featured in Graphic Icons and am sharing an assortment of their holiday designs for your inspiration. Watch for #12DaysOfDesigners on twitter. I’ll share one image each day, beginning on December 12th and wrapping up on the 23rd. I’ll also post the images here each day. Get inspired and share some of your favorites.

Last day! Saul Bass, 1968. Thanks to AIGA Design Archives.

Bass1968

Day 11: early Josef Müller-Brockmann for Bally. Thanks to Swann Galleries.

JMB_Bally_Swann

Day 10: Seasons Greetings from Paul Rand, 1957. Thanks to Aaron Cohen at Project Object.

Rand_Palina57-L

Day 9: Seymour Chwast, 2014. Thanks to Chwast’s Quote at Print Magazine.

Chwast_atheism_quote2014

Day 8: Ed Fella, 2011-12, by hand. Thanks to Bijan Berahimi.

Fella_HolidayGreetings-2012

Day 7: no clichés here: Edward McKnight Kauffer, holiday greeting for Ric Gregory, 1936.

Kauffer_1936_RicGregory-L

Day 6: Alex Steinweiss, album cover for Mantovani Christmas Carols, 1950s. You can buy this at New Documents.

Steinweiss_Montavani 1953

Day 5: Max Huber, best wishes from Il Giorno, 1957. From Designspiration.

Huber 57

Day 4: Milton Glaser for New York magazine, 1974. Thanks to Bob Caruthers on flickr.

Glaser_NY_74

Day 3: Brownjohn, Chermayeff & Geismar, late 1950s. Thanks to MoMA.

CGB 57-60

Day 2: Candy Christmas tree by Herbert Matter for House & Garden, 1953. Thanks to Conde Nast.

Matter_Conde_candytreeHG53

Day 1: Herbert Bayer, 1942. Via flickr: Playing Futures: Applied Nomadology.

Bayer1942

Greatest Living Designer?

GreatestLiving

Fast Company’s Co.Design is playing with March Madness and launching a competition for the world’s greatest living designer. Architects and interactive and product designers are represented, along with graphic designers. The field has been narrowed to 32 finalists, 8 in each category. Graphic icons Milton Glaser, Michael Bierut, Stefan Sagmeister, and Paula Scher made the cut. Unfortunately, the bracket setup means some tough choices have to be made—you can vote for Milton Glaser OR Michael Bierut, not both. Cast your vote. There are some complaints on twitter, but I think it’s meant as a fun diversion, not serious design journalism. What do you think?

HOW Magazine

How page1_c-l

“A great big book of who’s who in the creative world, Graphic Icons: Visionaries Who Shaped Modern Graphic Design is a visual tour de force that features everything from posters to multimedia projects. Striking work from the likes of Paul Rand, Milton Glaser, Paula Scher and other greats provides the imagery that guides readers through the pages.” Thank you, HOW Magazine!